OUR STORY

 When Angie and I looked at the old Chas M. Clements building to purchase we actually didn’t have a definitive plan, just a few random ideas. Both of us however, recognized great potential in the old building, albeit a lot of work as well. Before we started any work, I felt a New Orleans flair in the old building so We took a few days and headed to Louisiana for inspiration. The old architecture in the French Quarter has the same “bones” as most of our old buildings here on the square in Buena Vista so it didn’t take long for us to develop a vision of how we want the old Clements building to look. Next question was, “Well, how do we use it?”. Well, about that… I’ve only been to New Orleans once before and it was just for a few hours while on a cruise so I never really had a chance to check out the “must see stuff”. Being a huge fan of blues music and dixieland jazz, visiting “Preservation Hall” was high on my list. Now, Preservation Hall is not a fancy place. If you’ve never been picture a dilapidated old building that is basically one room lined with benches, and always a line around the corner to get in to hear the best, un-amplified 5 piece blues and jazz band on the planet. Angie and I were fortunate enough to be the last 2 to get in that night and even in the off season about 50 people were turned away. Being the last ones in, there was no room left on the benches so we were elbow to elbow with about 30 or so folks standing, packed like sardines, in the back. Something about the old wood and exposed brick walls appealed to me even though the single large room was obviously in a state of disrepair. Then the fun started! The band walked out to the front of the room (there is no stage) and took their positions. 5 men of varying ages all dressed in black pants, white short sleeve shirts (unpressed) and black bow ties. They all said good evening to a mild round of applause and then immediately dove into their craft. I don’t know if it was the acoustics of the old building or the overall ambiance or the fact that the lead singer (also the trumpet player) didn’t even use a microphone but about 30 seconds in I looked over at Angie and said “This is what I want!” They finished their set to thunderous applause in the old room and even played an encore of “When The Saints Go Marching In”. They will only play that one for a $20 tip. At this point Angie and I were both full steam ahead! A venue with live music (what we like in music) from time to time and we will make it available for rentals for people to host their own events. Now, what do we call it? Well the “hall” part was kind of a natural, you know, one large room used for events but couldn’t just call it “The Hall”. Any of our friends from Marion County all know that there is a tremendous amount of community pride here. Also, with positive things happening both in the county to bring in out of town visitors and the the slow but steady improvements being made to the jewels of old buildings we have here on the town square, we wanted to tie a bit of community pride to the project. Angie and I discussed several possibilities but it was on the drive home from New Orleans that it came to me. At that point we had tabled the discussion and I think we were talking about where to stop for lunch and I just spouted out loud “Fox”. Angie, with a puzzled look said “come again”. “Fox Hall” I elaborated. Her interest was sparked but wasn’t sure how this name tied into anything so I went on to explain that Marion County is named after Revolutionary war hero Sir Francis Marion. If you’re a history buff you may know that Sir Marion is considered the father of modern gorilla warfare and his tactics were do devastating to the Redcoats that the British dubbed him “The Swamp FOX”, so Fox Hall was born!

We are here for you

Courteous and professional, our staff takes great pride in providing you the highest level of service for your event. Our goal is to be your dream venue for any gathering such as weddings, family reunions, birthdays, or any other special occasion when you want the best.

OUR TEAM

Britt Moon

Owner and Contractor

Britt Moon is a successful local land developer and entrepreneur. He saw potential in the old Clements Building when he bought it. He and his wife Angie restored the building to be period correct with a few modern conveniences, adding only minor changes in respect to the original design.

 

 

Angie Moon

Owner and Designer

Angie Moon, the wife of Britt Moon, designed the interior of Fox Hall. With over 20 years experience, there is little more she enjoys than bringing vintage architecture back from the "grave". She made sure to keep that turn of the century feeling of Fox Hall with every detail from light fixtures to using the original display fixtures from the old hardware store as the bar.

 

 

Mike Moon

Manager

Mike Moon, the son of Britt and Angie Moon, has been working in the "family business" since he was a child. After working in a bar in Milledgeville, GA for a while, Mike came to Buena Vista to help with the demolition and renovation of Fox Hall. After the grand opening Mike took the responsibility of managing this beautiful venue.

Taylor Bradburn

Bartender

Taylor Bradburn is Fox Hall's head bartender. Admitting openly to being a bit "heavy handed" she is a crowd favorite and a true mixologist.  Born and raised in Columbus Georgia. Taylor is self taught and has been bartending  in various bars in the area for over 6 years. Taylor loves working in a social setting and can make any drink to suit your needs.

 

 

 

Courteous and professional, our staff takes great pride in providing you the highest level of service for your event. Our goal is to be your dream venue for any gathering such as weddings, family reunions, birthdays, or any other special occasion when you want the best.  When Angie and I looked at the old Chas M. Clements building to purchase we actually didn’t have a definitive plan, just a few random ideas. Both of us however, recognized great potential in the old building, albeit a lot of work as well. Before we started any work, I felt a New Orleans flair in the old building so We took a few days and headed to Louisiana for inspiration. The old architecture in the French Quarter has the same “bones” as most of our old buildings here on the square in Buena Vista so it didn’t take long for us to develop a vision of how we want the old Clements building to look. Next question was, “Well, how do we use it?”. Well, about that… I’ve only been to New Orleans once before and it was just for a few hours while on a cruise so I never really had a chance to check out the “must see stuff”. Being a huge fan of blues music and dixieland jazz, visiting “Preservation Hall” was high on my list. Now, Preservation Hall is not a fancy place. If you’ve never been picture a dilapidated old building that is basically one room lined with benches, and always a line around the corner to get in to hear the best, un-amplified 5 piece blues and jazz band on the planet. Angie and I were fortunate enough to be the last 2 to get in that night and even in the off season about 50 people were turned away. Being the last ones in, there was no room left on the benches so we were elbow to elbow with about 30 or so folks standing, packed like sardines, in the back. Something about the old wood and exposed brick walls appealed to me even though the single large room was obviously in a state of disrepair. Then the fun started! The band walked out to the front of the room (there is no stage) and took their positions. 5 men of varying ages all dressed in black pants, white short sleeve shirts (unpressed) and black bow ties. They all said good evening to a mild round of applause and then immediately dove into their craft. I don’t know if it was the acoustics of the old building or the overall ambiance or the fact that the lead singer (also the trumpet player) didn’t even use a microphone but about 30 seconds in I looked over at Angie and said “This is what I want!” They finished their set to thunderous applause in the old room and even played an encore of “When The Saints Go Marching In”. They will only play that one for a $20 tip. At this point Angie and I were both full steam ahead! A venue with live music (what we like in music) from time to time and we will make it available for rentals for people to host their own events. Now, what do we call it? Well the “hall” part was kind of a natural, you know, one large room used for events but couldn’t just call it “The Hall”. Any of our friends from Marion County all know that there is a tremendous amount of community pride here. Also, with positive things happening both in the county to bring in out of town visitors and the the slow but steady improvements being made to the jewels of old buildings we have here on the town square, we wanted to tie a bit of community pride to the project. Angie and I discussed several possibilities but it was on the drive home from New Orleans that it came to me. At that point we had tabled the discussion and I think we were talking about where to stop for lunch and I just spouted out loud “Fox”. Angie, with a puzzled look said “come again”. “Fox Hall” I elaborated. Her interest was sparked but wasn’t sure how this name tied into anything so I went on to explain that Marion County is named after Revolutionary war hero Sir Francis Marion. If you’re a history buff you may know that Sir Marion is considered the father of modern gorilla warfare and his tactics were do devastating to the Redcoats that the British dubbed him “The Swamp FOX”, so Fox Hall was born!
Courteous and professional, our staff takes great pride in providing you the highest level of service for your event. Our goal is to be your dream venue for any gathering such as weddings, family reunions, birthdays, or any other special occasion when you want the best.  When Angie and I looked at the old Chas M. Clements building to purchase we actually didn’t have a definitive plan, just a few random ideas. Both of us however, recognized great potential in the old building, albeit a lot of work as well. Before we started any work, I felt a New Orleans flair in the old building so We took a few days and headed to Louisiana for inspiration. The old architecture in the French Quarter has the same “bones” as most of our old buildings here on the square in Buena Vista so it didn’t take long for us to develop a vision of how we want the old Clements building to look. Next question was, “Well, how do we use it?”. Well, about that… I’ve only been to New Orleans once before and it was just for a few hours while on a cruise so I never really had a chance to check out the “must see stuff”. Being a huge fan of blues music and dixieland jazz, visiting “Preservation Hall” was high on my list. Now, Preservation Hall is not a fancy place. If you’ve never been picture a dilapidated old building that is basically one room lined with benches, and always a line around the corner to get in to hear the best, un-amplified 5 piece blues and jazz band on the planet. Angie and I were fortunate enough to be the last 2 to get in that night and even in the off season about 50 people were turned away. Being the last ones in, there was no room left on the benches so we were elbow to elbow with about 30 or so folks standing, packed like sardines, in the back. Something about the old wood and exposed brick walls appealed to me even though the single large room was obviously in a state of disrepair. Then the fun started! The band walked out to the front of the room (there is no stage) and took their positions. 5 men of varying ages all dressed in black pants, white short sleeve shirts (unpressed) and black bow ties. They all said good evening to a mild round of applause and then immediately dove into their craft. I don’t know if it was the acoustics of the old building or the overall ambiance or the fact that the lead singer (also the trumpet player) didn’t even use a microphone but about 30 seconds in I looked over at Angie and said “This is what I want!” They finished their set to thunderous applause in the old room and even played an encore of “When The Saints Go Marching In”. They will only play that one for a $20 tip. At this point Angie and I were both full steam ahead! A venue with live music (what we like in music) from time to time and we will make it available for rentals for people to host their own events. Now, what do we call it? Well the “hall” part was kind of a natural, you know, one large room used for events but couldn’t just call it “The Hall”. Any of our friends from Marion County all know that there is a tremendous amount of community pride here. Also, with positive things happening both in the county to bring in out of town visitors and the the slow but steady improvements being made to the jewels of old buildings we have here on the town square, we wanted to tie a bit of community pride to the project. Angie and I discussed several possibilities but it was on the drive home from New Orleans that it came to me. At that point we had tabled the discussion and I think we were talking about where to stop for lunch and I just spouted out loud “Fox”. Angie, with a puzzled look said “come again”. “Fox Hall” I elaborated. Her interest was sparked but wasn’t sure how this name tied into anything so I went on to explain that Marion County is named after Revolutionary war hero Sir Francis Marion. If you’re a history buff you may know that Sir Marion is considered the father of modern gorilla warfare and his tactics were do devastating to the Redcoats that the British dubbed him “The Swamp FOX”, so Fox Hall was born!
Courteous and professional, our staff takes great pride in providing you the highest level of service for your event. Our goal is to be your dream venue for any gathering such as weddings, family reunions, birthdays, or any other special occasion when you want the best.  When Angie and I looked at the old Chas M. Clements building to purchase we actually didn’t have a definitive plan, just a few random ideas. Both of us however, recognized great potential in the old building, albeit a lot of work as well. Before we started any work, I felt a New Orleans flair in the old building so We took a few days and headed to Louisiana for inspiration. The old architecture in the French Quarter has the same “bones” as most of our old buildings here on the square in Buena Vista so it didn’t take long for us to develop a vision of how we want the old Clements building to look. Next question was, “Well, how do we use it?”. Well, about that… I’ve only been to New Orleans once before and it was just for a few hours while on a cruise so I never really had a chance to check out the “must see stuff”. Being a huge fan of blues music and dixieland jazz, visiting “Preservation Hall” was high on my list. Now, Preservation Hall is not a fancy place. If you’ve never been picture a dilapidated old building that is basically one room lined with benches, and always a line around the corner to get in to hear the best, un-amplified 5 piece blues and jazz band on the planet. Angie and I were fortunate enough to be the last 2 to get in that night and even in the off season about 50 people were turned away. Being the last ones in, there was no room left on the benches so we were elbow to elbow with about 30 or so folks standing, packed like sardines, in the back. Something about the old wood and exposed brick walls appealed to me even though the single large room was obviously in a state of disrepair. Then the fun started! The band walked out to the front of the room (there is no stage) and took their positions. 5 men of varying ages all dressed in black pants, white short sleeve shirts (unpressed) and black bow ties. They all said good evening to a mild round of applause and then immediately dove into their craft. I don’t know if it was the acoustics of the old building or the overall ambiance or the fact that the lead singer (also the trumpet player) didn’t even use a microphone but about 30 seconds in I looked over at Angie and said “This is what I want!” They finished their set to thunderous applause in the old room and even played an encore of “When The Saints Go Marching In”. They will only play that one for a $20 tip. At this point Angie and I were both full steam ahead! A venue with live music (what we like in music) from time to time and we will make it available for rentals for people to host their own events. Now, what do we call it? Well the “hall” part was kind of a natural, you know, one large room used for events but couldn’t just call it “The Hall”. Any of our friends from Marion County all know that there is a tremendous amount of community pride here. Also, with positive things happening both in the county to bring in out of town visitors and the the slow but steady improvements being made to the jewels of old buildings we have here on the town square, we wanted to tie a bit of community pride to the project. Angie and I discussed several possibilities but it was on the drive home from New Orleans that it came to me. At that point we had tabled the discussion and I think we were talking about where to stop for lunch and I just spouted out loud “Fox”. Angie, with a puzzled look said “come again”. “Fox Hall” I elaborated. Her interest was sparked but wasn’t sure how this name tied into anything so I went on to explain that Marion County is named after Revolutionary war hero Sir Francis Marion. If you’re a history buff you may know that Sir Marion is considered the father of modern gorilla warfare and his tactics were do devastating to the Redcoats that the British dubbed him “The Swamp FOX”, so Fox Hall was born!
 When Angie and I looked at the old Chas M. Clements building to purchase we actually didn’t have a definitive plan, just a few random ideas. Both of us however, recognized great potential in the old building, albeit a lot of work as well. Before we started any work, I felt a New Orleans flair in the old building so We took a few days and headed to Louisiana for inspiration. The old architecture in the French Quarter has the same “bones” as most of our old buildings here on the square in Buena Vista so it didn’t take long for us to develop a vision of how we want the old Clements building to look. Next question was, “Well, how do we use it?”. Well, about that… I’ve only been to New Orleans once before and it was just for a few hours while on a cruise so I never really had a chance to check out the “must see stuff”. Being a huge fan of blues music and dixieland jazz, visiting “Preservation Hall” was high on my list. Now, Preservation Hall is not a fancy place. If you’ve never been picture a dilapidated old building that is basically one room lined with benches, and always a line around the corner to get in to hear the best, un-amplified 5 piece blues and jazz band on the planet. Angie and I were fortunate enough to be the last 2 to get in that night and even in the off season about 50 people were turned away. Being the last ones in, there was no room left on the benches so we were elbow to elbow with about 30 or so folks standing, packed like sardines, in the back. Something about the old wood and exposed brick walls appealed to me even though the single large room was obviously in a state of disrepair. Then the fun started! The band walked out to the front of the room (there is no stage) and took their positions. 5 men of varying ages all dressed in black pants, white short sleeve shirts (unpressed) and black bow ties. They all said good evening to a mild round of applause and then immediately dove into their craft. I don’t know if it was the acoustics of the old building or the overall ambiance or the fact that the lead singer (also the trumpet player) didn’t even use a microphone but about 30 seconds in I looked over at Angie and said “This is what I want!” They finished their set to thunderous applause in the old room and even played an encore of “When The Saints Go Marching In”. They will only play that one for a $20 tip. At this point Angie and I were both full steam ahead! A venue with live music (what we like in music) from time to time and we will make it available for rentals for people to host their own events. Now, what do we call it? Well the “hall” part was kind of a natural, you know, one large room used for events but couldn’t just call it “The Hall”. Any of our friends from Marion County all know that there is a tremendous amount of community pride here. Also, with positive things happening both in the county to bring in out of town visitors and the the slow but steady improvements being made to the jewels of old buildings we have here on the town square, we wanted to tie a bit of community pride to the project. Angie and I discussed several possibilities but it was on the drive home from New Orleans that it came to me. At that point we had tabled the discussion and I think we were talking about where to stop for lunch and I just spouted out loud “Fox”. Angie, with a puzzled look said “come again”. “Fox Hall” I elaborated. Her interest was sparked but wasn’t sure how this name tied into anything so I went on to explain that Marion County is named after Revolutionary war hero Sir Francis Marion. If you’re a history buff you may know that Sir Marion is considered the father of modern gorilla warfare and his tactics were do devastating to the Redcoats that the British dubbed him “The Swamp FOX”, so Fox Hall was born!
Courteous and professional, our staff takes great pride in providing you the highest level of service for your event. Our goal is to be your dream venue for any gathering such as weddings, family reunions, birthdays, or any other special occasion when you want the best.